Eurasian Collared Doves

Eurasian Collared Doves have been identified in New Denver. This species, which has been in Nakusp for several years was only first recorded in this area when I saw one in Rosebery last year. I did not see it apart from a few days in the spring when it sat in the neighbour’s tree and called regularly. Since we had a nesting pair of Merlins in the same area it may have moved on or worse (for the dove). Thanks to Anne Champagne for reporting the sighting.

Eurasia Collared Doves are not native to this area and a considered “invasive”. Please report any further sightings to this website.

Further on bird sightings, I am happy to report that the Barn Swallows (a species of concern in this area) are back in Silverton. There are perhaps three or more pair flying around and hopefully nesting again. There were two pairs nesting in Silverton the last couple of years.

Advertisements

6 thoughts on “Eurasian Collared Doves

  1. We have had Eurasian Collared Doves visiting our yard for about 4 or 5 years, but I just recently tried to identify the species. I have seen the more common Mourning Doves all my life, so I knew they were not Mourning Doves, but I didn’t know they were a non-native species, until I did some research. This photos was taken just a day or two after we noticed this nest. They hadn’t laid any eggs in it yet. There was a bad hail storm the next day, and for some reason, they abandoned the nest, and started building another nest, is a different tree.

    • Hi Burt Where do you live? I am trying to track their locations. We found a killed one in New Denver a few weeks ago. Since the kill was eaten on the spot, beside a building in town, suspect a Pygmy or Sawwhet Owl

  2. We have had Eurasian Collared Doves visiting our yard for about 4 or 5 years, but I just recently tried to identify the species. I have seen the more common Mourning Doves all my life, so I knew they were not Mourning Doves, but I didn’t know they were a non-native species, until I did some research. This photos was taken just a day or two after we noticed this nest. They hadn’t laid any eggs in it yet. There was a bad hail storm the next day, and for some reason, they abandoned the nest, and started building another nest, is a different tree.

  3. No species of bird has colonized North America at the speed with which the Eurasian Collared-Dove (Streptopelia decaocto) has marched across the continent. First found nesting just south of Miami, Florida, in 1982, this non-native dove has rapidly adapted to human-altered environments from Florida to Alaska. FeederWatch has provided a crucial source of information on this invasion and insight into how this invader may be affecting populations of native doves.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s